Tom Apodaca
(919) 733-5745
Tom.Apodaca@
ncleg.net
District includes: Buncombe, Henderson, Polk
District 49:
Martin L. Nesbitt Jr.
(919) 715-3001
Martin.Nesbitt@
ncleg.net
District includes: Buncombe

District 114:
Susan C. Fisher
919-715-2013
Susan.Fisher@
ncleg.net
District includes: Buncombe
District 115:
Patsy Keever
919-733-5746
Patsy.Keever@
ncleg.net
District includes: Buncombe

District 116:
Tim D. Moffitt
919-715-3012
Tim.Moffitt@ncleg.net
District includes: Buncombe



 
Taken just before holiday break, these photos will be part of TEDxNGA's (Technology, Engineering, Design's Asheville affiliate for young people) photodocumentary project. Though I am not a great photographer and there are some odd lighting issues here, the ideas and your passion about them is FABULOUS.
 
  If knowing your own opinion and your own feelings about issues is the place to start writing to change the world--the second step is finding out more. Lots of times, we think that the big issues are far away from us--like the war--or far in the past, like the discrimination against people of color and the civil rights movement. A writer who wants to change the world NOTICES what is happening--by paying attention. The local newspaper, the local radio stations and television stations, and internet news sites for children are all good places to learn about what is going on--and so is talking with your family, your teachers,  and your friends.  We discover that while the war might be far away in physical distance, its impact is felt right here in the mountains. We wish that racial discrimination was in our past, but we discover that it's not. These are just two issues of concern--what else might you find?

Assignment:
This week, pay attention and notice. Choose an issue that concerns you and write a reflection on your blog. A reflection is simply a statement about how you feel and what you think about the issue and WHY.  You might choose an issue we've discussed in class, or you might choose an issue that you read about in the local paper or heard about on the news. The reflection should be at least one paragraph.

 

   Suspects in cross burning near Fletcher still free

 

Afghanistan takes its toll on WNC families

 
Racial Slurs yelled at Local Residents
 
To go along with the post about opinions, facts, and feelings--here is a project that a local group, TEDxNextGenerationAsheville is doing--gathering ideas from young people around the area. Let's be part of the project and send in our ideas--all it takes is an idea or opinion, a piece of paper, a magic marker, and a camera--which I'll supply.

Ideas Worth Spreading link

 
Writing to change the world. What does that mean and where do you start?

One way to start is with your opinion. Here's what the dictionary says about opinion: A belief or conclusion held with confidence but not substantiated by positive knowledge or proof.

That's a pretty fancy way of saying that an opinion is something you believe--you might be able to point to facts that helped you come to the opinion or you might not. The important thing is that you believe that something is true or that something should be a certain way. Sometimes, you have an opinion and then you learn more about the topic and your opinion changes. Sometimes, you have an opinion and then someone presents information that persuades you to change your mind.

Another way to start writing to change the world is to start with a feeling. All good writers NOTICE what is going on in his or her own life, his or her own community, the country, the world! Sometimes, we notice or experience things that make us feel sad or that trouble us, might even make us feel afraid or angry. We may not yet have an opinion, we just have the feeling.

Which leads us to facts. The dictionary says that fact are: Knowledge or information based on real occurrences. Something demonstrated to exist or known to have existed.

You probably have gathered facts before--maybe you've looked for facts about a country or a tradition and pasted them onto a poster. Some facts just can't be argued with--we live in Asheville, North Carolina, for example. You go to school at Isaac Dickson Elementary School.

But not all facts are seen in the same way by every person. Think about Kek. In his country, a cow is special, to be treated with the greatest respect. A cow is a cow. That's a fact. But because he has a particular world view, he has an opinion of cows that might be different from the average citizen in the United States. In fact, he might point to all the same qualities of the cow that you would--and value them more highly.

It's all very interesting--and we'll be talking more about opinion, feelings, facts and how to write to change the world using all of them.

Here's is a video of a boy who lives right here in Asheville who has a very strong opinion about food. He researched his topic and then presented his opinion, his feelings, and his facts to an audience.  





Transitions!

11/15/2010

 
     Now that you have spoken with a partner about the piece you would like to "re-envision," written down some answers to questions that popped up, cut apart your draft, organized it on a larger piece of paper and glued it down--it's time to check the TRANSITIONS!
     Transitions are merely words or groups of words that move a story, a letter, an essay, a research paper from one part to the next. I think of them as the merge ramps for when cars get on a highway. 
     Good transitions go beyond just saying- And or Then. Below is a list of transition words- that can be used to move from one idea to the next, one paragraph to the next--

Assignment
Look at the piece you are re-envisioning with a partner. Ask them to circle the places where he or she feels like there needs to be better transition.

Add transition words and sentences (right on the draft) that will help your reader to merge smoothly throughout your writing!

Transition Words

 

Words that can be used to show location:

above

behind

by

near

throughout

across

below

down

off

to the right

against

beneath

in back of

onto

under

along

beside

in front of

on top of

 

among

between

inside

outside

 

around

beyond

into

over

 

 

Words that can be used to show time:

while

first

meanwhile

soon

then

after

second

today

later

next

at

third

tomorrow

afterward

as soon as

before

now

next week

about

when suddenly

during

until

yesterday

finally

 

 

Word that can be used to compare two things:

likewise

also

while

in the same way

like

as

similarly

 

 

Words that can be used to contrast two things:

but

still

although

on the other hand

however

yet

otherwise

even though

 

Words that can be used to emphasize a point:

again

truly

especially

for this reason

to repeat

in fact

to emphasize

 

 

Words that can be used to conclude or summarize:

finally

as a result

to sum up

in conclusion

lastly

therefore

all in all

because

 

Words that can be used to add information:

again

another

for instance

for example

also

and

moreover

additionally

as well

besides

along with

other

next

finally

in addition

 

 

Words that can be used to clarify:

that is

for instance

in other words

 



 
A couple of weeks, we talked about world view and you worked on a first draft of your poem. Instead of posting it to your blog--wait and work it on with Ms. Keena during your poetry time. She'll be working with you on other poetic concepts and won't be get to this particular poem right away--but when she does, you'll have a chance to really dive in and make a poem that is rich with creativity! You'll also get a chance to interview your parents about your heritage--which will be so interesting.

Thanks to Ms. Keena!